Using Xibo for community television for video and info

Is there anyone else using Xibo for community television / public access?

(Here in the USA, there are thousands of stations at a city or regional level that play on the local cable television system, showing government meetings and local productions and school programs. Sometimes they’re called “PEG” channels for “public, educational, governmental.”)

I’m intrigued by Xibo. I wonder if it couldn’t replace an entire video server like those $xx,xxx video server systems from companies like Leightronix, Telvue, Granicus and Castus.

Many PEG stations run programs as-is on length and then have some kind of info graphic continuity signal for when programs aren’t running.

Obviously those dedicated video servers have a very TV-style interface for importing video content, seeing thumbnails and metadata describing and categorizing the videos, and then scheduling them to play at very specific times. I’m still learning Xibo to learn the best way to carry out that kind of program schedule. Any advice is appreciated.

Pushing a few gigs of MP4 for a day’s schedule of video programming doesn’t tax the network or the players if they’re all on the same local network. Am I missing something here?

As I practiced making layouts for this PEG environment, I wrote a PHP program that runs on my Xibo server that scrapes the HTML from web-based daily program schedules from the Leightronix and Telvue servers and converts it to iCal calendar format so it can be displayed in Xibo. Now I have layouts that show the day’s programming schedule and an “up next” option.

Xibo would work great for networked digital signage in various locations in a small town or region to spread info about community events - delegating local chamber of commerce representatives to admin their content.

I’ve also written some PHP that converts the RecDesk.com JSON API calendar to iCal format. RecDesk is a web booking service used by park and recreation departments in US cities.

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